HomeNewsArticle Display

Article Display

Haunted Hangars proves success even under shroud of voting controversy

Haunted Hangars 2017

A boy dressed as a World War II-era U.S. Army soldier throws a football at a target during the Nevada National Guard's annual Haunted Hangars event at the Nevada Air National Guard Base on Oct. 27, 2017.

NEVADA AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE --

Haunted Hangars, one of the Nevada National Guard's most popular annual events held Oct. 27, included haunted houses, music, bounce houses, refreshments and even alleged voter fraud.

"Airmen led the way on the haunted houses," said Ryan Wickes, Nevada National Guard child and youth program coordinator. "They really worked hard and this wouldn't have been possible without them."

Total attendance was 805, Wickes said. Additionally, 86 people volunteered, he said.

 Volunteers included Guardsmen and several community groups, including Red Cross, Blue Star Mothers and Break Through Reno.

Haunted houses were judged on three categories: most scary, people's choice and most creative.

The winners: 152nd Intelligence Squadron, Most Scary; 152nd Operations Group, People's Choice; and 152nd Maintenance Group, Most Creative.

 "I had a lot of people say ours was best," said Master Sgt. Christina Sweat, 152nd Maintenance Group. "We had numerous people come through more than once."

 "I had a lot of people actually say ours was scarier than Intel's," said Tech. Sgt. Meagan Castro, of the maintenance group. "We were confused with the outcome of the scariest house. I want you to quote me on that."

 At press time, the Intel Squadron would not confirm or deny Castro's claim.